Cognitive Bias and Decision Making

Author: Dr. Dave Hill

Thinking about a recent M&M case and the roles that bias plays in how patient care is delivered, I don’t think I could say it better than the Drs. at EM Ottawa (emottawablog.com).

“Clinical decision making is an extremely complex process, and healthcare professionals often develop adaptive mechanisms [heuristics or biases] as we are faced with repeated similar experiences in a busy clinical environment.”

Meningitis

Author: Dr. Trevor Landas Defined as inflammation of the meninges, or covering layers of the central nervous system, meningitis has a high morbidity and mortality if not identified and treated promptly. The incidence is approximately 1.38 per 100,000 people. Clinical Presentation: Presenting symptoms include the classic triad of fever, neck stiffness, and altered mental status,

Migraine Cocktail: over IV fluids or neat?

Author: Dr. Calloway Pichette Article: IV Fluids for the treatment of Emergency Department patients with migraine headache: a randomized controlled trial  Background: Headache, a common complaint in the ED. Many times a day we see patients with migraine headaches in the ED. Give them a migraine cocktail (sadly, no martinis involved…) and then viola! They

Central Line Placement

Author:  Lauran Wirfs

Background:

Central venous access is an important procedure for critically ill patients. One consideration when placing a venous catheter is the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBIs), which can be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. In 2012, there were 15 million central venous catheter (CVC) days per year in the US in ICUs, and the rate of infections per catheter days is 3/1000. This post looks at a systematic review done by Marik et. al. that examines CRBIs among internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral central venous sites.

Psychiatric Emergencies

Author: Dr. Corey Goldstein

Intro

We had a great lecture from Dr. Goldstein on psychiatric emergencies and he was also nice enough to write the below blog post for it as well! Very helpful talk as he can approach it from multiple perspectives as he has worked as a psychiatric attending and is about to finish his residency in emergency medicine. Hope you enjoy.

Journal: Canadian C-Spine

Author:  Dr. Keya Patel

Background

Each year, more than 1 million patients are treated in the emergency department for blunt trauma and potential C-spine injury. Cervical CT remains the mainstay of imaging in assessing for injury. Here, we review the Canadian C-spine Rule in determining the need for advanced imaging such as CT.