Clinical Sites

Rush University Medical Center


Rush University Medical Center (RUMC) is a 676-bed not-for-profit academic center affiliated with Rush University, and will serve as the primary site for the Rush Emergency Medicine Residency.  The RUMC ED sees approximately 74,000 patients per year from a diverse population from the city of Chicago as well as the wider metro market. With a rapidly growing volume with high rates of critical care and acute care admissions, it is also one of the newest and most technologically integrated ED facilities in the region.  The ED has a long reputation as a primary teaching and learning environment for both residents and medical students. Residents will spend most of their non-ED time at Rush rotating in a variety of critical care units.

Rush-Copley Medical Center


Rush-Copley Medical Center is a 210-bed hospital located west of the city in Illinois’ 2nd largest city, Aurora. Rush-Copley treats nearly 70,000 people each year and will serve as a high value Community ED experience for our EM residents. Residents will benefit from the large volume of pediatric patients seen in the ED, which approaches 30%. Residents will learn valuable skills relevant to community emergency medicine practice including stabilization of patients for transfer and management of patients without immediate access to tertiary care or backup subspeciality care.

John H. Stroger Hospital of Cook County


The John H. Stroger Hospital of Cook County is a public teaching hospital in the Illinois Medical District, adjacent to the Rush University campus. Residents will rotate on the trauma service, which is one of the largest in the US seeing over 5700 trauma activations a year. As one of the primary trauma training centers in the Chicago region, Rush EM residents will have the opportunity to work with colleagues from a number of local and regional EM programs as they rotate in the trauma ED, the SICU, and Stroger burn unit.

Mount Sinai Hospital Medical Center


Mount Sinai Hospital Medical Center, is a 319-licensed acute care bed, not-for-profit community teaching hospital located on Chicago’s West side.  The Emergency Department provides care to approximately 50,000 annually, and operates as a Level 1 Adult Trauma Center treating approximately 2,000 Level 1 trauma victims annually. Mount Sinai’s emergency department reflects the latest in design and technological innovations in emergency care.  The 24 treatment areas include cardiac care rooms with continuous 12-lead cardiac monitoring, multiple fully-equipped trauma resuscitation bays with OR capabilities, and separate areas for OB/Gyn, isolation, medical, surgical, pediatric, and disruptive patients.

Community First Medical Center


Community First Medical Center is a 299 licensed bed community hospital located in Portage Park on the northwest side of Chicago. As the 5th busiest hospital in Chicago based on ambulance runs, the ED sees approximately 41,000 patients a year. The hospital is a Primary Stroke Center, Chest Pain Accredited with PCI with EDAP certification to provide quality care to all patients from pediatrics to geriatrics. Residents rotating in the ED will see a diverse mix of clinical cases from traditional community medicine to critical care with. Partnered with UIC for Stroke Telemedicine and Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital for Pediatric Telemedicine, residents will gain insight into the process for critical treatment and related transfer processes for those patients. Here residents will learn stabilization of patients, noninvasive and invasive procedures, along with critical thinking in a fast paced ED.


Kasia Gore, Assistant Professor

“I’m looking forward to having EM residents who will bring never-ending opportunities for continued learning, who will question and challenge – it’s an awesome way to always grow as a physician.  I also can’t wait for the camaraderie- we already have an amazing team of physicians who brighten each shift but adding more passionate and energetic individuals will make our department simply the best.”